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David's story for the campaign - We Are Undefeatable

David Chennells had an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) which ruptured whilst he was cycling to work and caused a subarachnoid haemorrhage. David was 26 when this happened. Despite this, David is an inspiration to us all in his determination and motivation to keep going and to keep moving.

The Brain and Spine Foundation supports the We Are Undefeatable Campaign.

We Are Undefeatable is a campaign that aims to empower people to build physical activity into their lives in small and achievable chunks, and is targeted at people living with long-term/chronic health problems in particular.

David is an example of someone that moves and stays active everyday despite his neurological problem. 

We spoke with David to find out more about why keeping active is important to him.

 

Staying active is important because it brings physical and mental well-being.

I was always active before the brain bleed, so I want to maintain that.

 

 

David, can you describe what happened to you in 2007?

Not very well. I remember cycling to work and feeling 'funny'. Then, I fell off my bike and hit the road. I blacked out and don't remember much else. I know a colleague helped me, but after that, blank. Friends and family tell me about my brain surgery, that I was in a coma, and in various hospitals. But I have no memory of this.

 

Why is keeping active important to you?

Staying active is important because it brings physical and mental well-being. I also enjoy the social aspect. I'm lucky to survive the massive bleed to my brain and want to make the most of every moment. Otherwise, what's the point? Socialising is rewarding.

 

What sort of activities do you do? What motivates you to stay active?

I go to the gym three times a week. I use the weights, bike, do upper-body work, and use the battle ropes. I also walk as much as I can. I volunteer at the CAB and at an education and training centre. Wanting to stay fit and healthy motivates me. I was always active before the brain bleed, so I want to maintain that. If I couldn't be active, I'd find it monotonous.

 

Any words you’d like to share with people reading this?

To others with a brain injury, I would say that it may seem life is going downhill at first. But, trust me, with determination and belief in yourself, things will improve. Push yourself and stay positive.

 

David you're an inspiration to us all.